Tag Archives: software

ScoobyRom v0.8.2 Released

What’s new in v0.8.2:
  • Export as TunerPro XDF format.
  • Support for ROM type SH72531 (1.25 MiB = 1280 KiB size)
  • Display Reflash Count if known/available (Properties-window).

Project homepage: ScoobyRom Software

Properties

Already implemented in previous version is the ability to parse and display ROM Date (year-month-day), diesel as well as petrol type encodings. May not work for all ROM types (yet), though. AFAIK, ScoobyRom is the only software parsing this Denso specific date.

ScoobyRom 0.8.2 - Properties window, CID JZ4A211B

ScoobyRom 0.8.2 – Properties window, CID JZ4A211B

TunerPro (XDF)

Due to my intense work on BMW ECUs in recent years, I got familiar with TunerPro which is a generic ROM editor. It is quite popular in the BMW community, it can handle lots of data format options. Its definition format “XDF” is XML-based as usual. As an exercise to verify XDF knowledge I implemented XDF output in ScoobyRom.

Compared to RomRaider, reading an XDF containing hundreds of tables is very fast, almost instant. TunerPro is Windows-only and closed-source however.

TunerPro 5.00.8853 screenshot, Windows 10 x64, XDF generated by ScoobyRom

TunerPro 5.00.8853 screenshot, Windows 10 x64, XDF generated by ScoobyRom

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New pages: Software

Added new category “Software”. See sub-page Logging for software comparison.

Still incomplete and under construction. As always, do not hesitate to report feedback!

ParsePID

Just published my new little C# project:

ParsePID is a console application to analyse Extended/Enhanced OBD-II mode 22 capabilities, specifically for Subaru diesel and petrol control units supporting this protocol.

Go to http://github.com/SubaruDieselCrew/ParsePID/

  • README document includes demo output, currently for a diesel and petrol model.
  • The project uses published definitions from page Extended OBD-II, saved as CSV (delimiter: tab) format.
  • There is no need to compile the code for yourself if you haven’t got own data.

As always, do not hesitate to provide feedback…

ScoobyRom v0.8.0 Released

New in v0.8.0:
  • Navigation bar visualisation.
  • Additional columns (conversion: Multiplier & Offset or NaN if not used; Axes locations: XPos, YPos)
  • Select all/none
  • RomRaider definitions export: choose whether to export all/selected/annotated tables.
  • Roughly 3 times faster when scanning whole ROM.
  • Lots of misc improvements in code at least…

Go to homepage: ScoobyRom Software
Post software specific feedback there, please!
Also, if you find this software useful consider to “like” above page as minimum feedback and motivation for future work!

ScoobyRom v0.7.1 Released

New in v0.7.1:
  • Dynamically adjust icon size (Ctrl-+, Ctrl--, Ctrl-0)
  • Edit -> Copy Table: Can paste values into existing RomRaider table, spreadsheet (LibreOffice Calc, Microsoft Excel), text editor etc.
  • Miscellaneous improvements as always.
  • Also tested on Windows 10, no changes were necessary.

Go to page: ScoobyRom Software
Enjoy and provide software specific feedback there, please!

ScoobyRom v0.7.0 Released

Go to page: ScoobyRom Software

Enjoy and provide software specific feedback there, please!

ECU Coding: Ports v2

The engine control unit supports uploading code into RAM because that’s part of standard engine management software (ROM reflash) update procedure. I also use the transfer via CAN method as it is quite fast.
Actually, the ECUs stock firmware does not care about the uploaded bytes as long as generic conditions are met (max 12 KiB total size on diesels, checksum, …). That way you can abuse the system and do what you want. Did some relay/actuator testing lately, confirming some ports…

Tested ports

Valid for MY 2009/2010 Impreza Diesel Euro 4 only. Euro 5 models differ!

Port Type Function Comment
Port E
PE02 Out Radiator Fans both, low power
PE03 Out Radiator Fan left one only, high power
PE02 & PE03 Out Radiator Fans both, high power
PE11 Out Sub Fuel Pump noise originating from fuel tank area
PE12 Out A/C Compressor Clutch loud click noise, looking at pulley one can see clutch part move
PE14 Out MIL MIL
Port L
PL06 In Brake SW Almost same trigger point (pedal position) as stop light switch.
PL07 In Stop Light SW

I already knew those output ports from ROM analysis so it was rather safe for me to try them. Just reading any port is supposed to be safe.
Many are reversed, then bit ‘0‘ means ON and ‘1‘ is OFF.
The MIL is what I often use for debugging ECU code – e.g. flashing it to indicate some condition. Unlike most dashboard indications you don’t operate it using CAN messages (much more complicated).
However, ports can be model specific so one must be careful – i.e. might hit the starter with transmission not in neutral.

C/C++ Code snippet to test and operate a port


// Port E Data Register, from Renesas manual
#define PE_DR_w (uword*)0xFFFFF754
// Port L Data Register
#define PL_DR_w (uword*)0xFFFFF75E

// port bitmasks
const uword PE14_MIL = 1 << 14; // 0x4000
const uword PL06_BrakeSW = 1 << 6; // 0x40

void OperatePorts()
{
  for(;;)  // infinite loop
  {
    ToggleBits(PE_DR_w, PE14_MIL);  // toggle MIL
    uword pldr = *PL_DR_w;  // read Port L Data Register
    if ((pldr & PL06_BrakeSW) == 0)  // test bit
      Wait(100);  // Brake ON -> fast flashing of MIL
    else
      Wait(1000); // Brake OFF -> slow flashing, 1000 ms delay

    /* alternative, set (true) or clear bits (false):
    AdjustBits(PE_DR_w, PE14_MIL, true); // OFF
    Wait();
    AdjustBits(PE_DR_w, PE14_MIL, false); // ON
    Wait();
    */
  }
}

void ToggleBits(uword* address, uword bitmask)
{
  *address ^= bitmask; // XOR
}

Compilation

Questions: What software can I use to compile SuperH code? How much $$$?
Answer: Linux and utilities, all open source and free!

Free open source GNU compiler collection (GCC) can generate binaries for Renesas SH-2E, the microcontroller’s (e.g. SH7058S) CPU inside the engine control unit.
The beauty of GNU binutils plus GCC is, you can use the same toolchain to produce code for tons of different platforms1.
So same stuff I use for producing Intel/AMD PC x86/x64 software plus some platform specific command line options will do it. GCC is very powerful, supports multiple source code languages. (Personally, I even compile small Windows tools directly on Linux using winelib.)
Uploading a binary via CAN is another story but once it is automated, you don’t have to think about it, e.g. just run a make command…

1) Compiling binutils and GCC from source with target platform support enabled might be necessary. Default Linux packages usually have not been compiled with such special platform support enabled.

Display a list showing all architectures and object formats available for specification with -b or -m:
objdump --info